Car Culture

7 Women Who Changed The Auto Industry For Good

Reading Time: 2 minutes
[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Florence Lawrence”]

This “first movie star” also invented what we now refer to as “turn signals.” Born in 1886, Florence was an auto enthusiast who had seen her fair share of accidents. Frustrated by not knowing which direction the oncoming vehicle was going to turn, she invented “auto-signaling arms,” or flags on either side of the vehicle that were raised and lowered with a button.

But the famous actress’s inventions don’t stop there. She also put up a sign in the back of her car with the word “stop” on it. When the brakes were pressed down, the sign was triggered so the vehicle behind her would know to slow down as a sort of rudimentary “brake light.”

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Charlotte Bridgwood”]

The mother of Florence Lawrence, Charlotte Bridgwood played a key role in the development of automatic windshield wipers in 1917. And another female inventor was responsible for creating the first manual wipers a few years earlier!

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Bertha Benz “]

Bertha’s husband Karl Benz was the creator of the world’s first “practical” automotive. But she may have had more to do with his success than most history books give her credit for. Along with investing heavily in his company and using her business sense to help market his new fandangled Motor Car, Bertha Benz discovered brake pads to help cars on long trips.

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”The “Damsels of Design””]

Hired by GM to design cars for women in the 50s, this group of women hated the name they were given by management and were treated more like decorators than respected designers.  Nonetheless, they were responsible for creating many of our modern-day automotive features, including retractable seat belts, storage consoles, illuminated mirrors, and child safety door locks.

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Margaret Wilcox”]

As one of the few female mechanical engineers who existed in the 1800s, she invented the first car heater in 1893. While her design failed to receive a patent, her same system was used to develop the modernized car heater.

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Hedy Lamarr”]

Yep, this same stunning Austrian actress who starred in “Sampson and Delilah” helped design the wireless technology that led to GPS, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth enabled cars. When she wasn’t rehearsing lines and socializing with Howard Hughes, Hedy was using her brains to patent a frequency-hopping technology that laid the groundwork for the tech that’s a part of our everyday lives. 

In her words, inventions were easy, “I don’t have to work on ideas, they come naturally.”

[startapp_block_title animation=”” title=”Michelle Christensen”]

Inspired by working on muscle cars with her dad as a young girl, Michelle followed a career to auto design. Not only did she develop and design the Honda NSX and other Honda performance vehicles, but she was also the first woman to lead a supercar design team. You go, girl!

[startapp_separator border_width=”1″ opacity=”25″ animation=””]

Women are, without a doubt, as much of a driving force in the automotive industry as any other industry. As we’ve seen throughout history, nothing can stop a woman with a will. At FIXD, we salute women everywhere as we celebrate National Women’s Equality Day. If you’re a female who owns a FIXD Sensor, drop a comment below to let us know how it’s changed your experience at the repair shop!

Wife, mom, Content Manager & Senior Copywriter at FIXD. From the garage to the gym, I love helping people learn and grow. Dream car: ‘69 Acapulco Blue Mustang.

Kate McKnight
Wife, mom, Content Manager & Senior Copywriter at FIXD. From the garage to the gym, I love helping people learn and grow. Dream car: ‘69 Acapulco Blue Mustang.

    You may also like

    10 Comments

    1. ? Enjoy your Stories

    2. I haven’t been to a repair shop yet but I wanted to say how much I appreciated seeing this tribute to the women involved “behind the scenes” and bringing them out into the open. I had no idea and loved learning this! I’m really impressed with this company. Thank you for being informative and kind. It’s a nice balance. 🙂

    3. My dad taught me from early on to do maintenance including tune and even time my own VW. Oil changes and brakes were also a required skill. The FIXD Sensor really helps in these new tech cars, though. It makes it easier to verify repairs both before and after. Great technology!

    4. Sorry, I don’t do social media. But, as a ScoutsBSA leader I recognize this as a nice inspirational article to share with our local Girl troops. Thank you for recognizing that it’s not too late to appreciate and acknowledge the outstanding work women have done in engineering, sciences, and arts.

      1. Thank you David! We hope the local Girl Scout troop enjoys the article!

        – FIXD

    5. It’s great to know what’s wrong with my truck before visiting the repair shop since I got FIXD. I just smile when I visit the repair man, and he knows that I know the problem and estimated cost. This FIXD Sensor lowers the possibility of being cheated out of my money.

    6. This little and inexpensive FIXD device has saved me from being stranded on a highway or other roadway by alerting me to work that needed to be done. My mechanic is very impressed with it. I have made sure that my daughter and granddaughter have one in their cars as well.

      1. That makes our day to hear, Barbara! We are so glad to have been able to help you and your family. Thank you so much for the kind words and using FIXD. Happy and safe driving to you and yours!

    7. I loved this! Not just the old timey pictures (they were great!), but also to hear that women, the mothers of invention, were the pioneers of improving safety and the driving experience. Windshield wipers and brake pads, pretty important stuff!

      1. Thank you so much for the kind words, Joan! 🙂

    Leave a reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    More in Car Culture