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Best & Worst Years of Ford Expedition – Graphs & Owner Surveys

The best years of the Ford Expedition are 2021, 2018-2019, 2015-2017, and 2009-2010. The years you should absolutely avoid are 2001-2006, 2007-2008, 2011-2014, and 2020. Most issues are related to below-average safety scores, engine and transmission repairs, and a high cost of ownership.

Ford Expedition display at a dealership.

The Ford Expedition is a large SUV designed to carry a big family or plenty of cargo. With nearly two million Expedition SUVs sold since 2001, it’s clear to see this has become a popular model. Despite many great sales, several models are ones we wouldn’t consider going on an “expedition” with.

We’ve carefully analyzed the data to find the best and worst years of the Ford Expedition. Whether you are hoping to find a used SUV or you are the current owner deciding whether to keep it, our data proves to be invaluable. We’ve sourced our information from thousands of FIXD car scanners installed in Ford Expedition models. We put this data together with our owner surveys and published sources showing fuel economy, recalls, safety ratings, and more to determine which models are worth your money. 

Best Years Why? Worst Years Why?
2021 Highest reliability ratings, good safety rating, low cost of ownership 2001-2006 Poor safety scores, lack of reliability, high cost of ownership
2018-2019 Great reliability scores, decent fuel economy, low cost of maintenance and repairs 2007-2008 Low reliability ratings, sub-par fuel economy, high cost of ownership
2015-2017 Favorable reliability ratings, low chance of expensive repairs, good safety scores 2011-2014 Below-average safety scores, higher chance of repairs costing more than $500
2009-2010 Highest safety scores, low chance of engine repairs, reasonable cost of ownership 2020 Possible higher chance of engine and transmission problems

Ford Expedition Engine Reliability Score, Safety Ratings, MPG, and Value v.s. Maintenance & Repair Costs –  Year by Year

To make the best transportation decisions, you must look at all of the data. To compare Ford Expedition models, we looked at data on engine reliability, safety scores, resale value, fuel economy and more. 

If you’re in the market for a car, take a look at our article on the USAs’ most reliable and cheapest to repair cars in the U.S. Don’t get stuck with a lemon, use our data to help you shop.

Engine Reliability Score – Over The Years

Ford Expedition Reliability Score

To determine how reliable each Ford Expedition model year is, we’ll look at 2 different ratings.

  1. The FIXD Reliability score (Green line) – based on how many check engine lights are thrown by Expeditions every 12,000 miles of driving (1 year’s worth of driving). 
  2. The Owner Reliability score (Gray line) from the surveyed Expedition owners. 

 

For the most part, the newer a model is, the better the reliability seems. Additionally, the gap between the two surveys tends to be closer on the newer Expeditions. 

Still, we have a lower Owner Reliability score than we’d like to see on a 2018 model. The reduced score could simply be caused by a lack of data, OR it could be related to the 2018 being the first model year in its generation. 

As we analyze the reliability scores for each model year and rank it in the best and worst years list, feel free to read only what you need. We make it easy to find the model year range you are looking for. 

NHTSA Safety Score – Over The Years

Ford Expedition Safety Rating

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) provides the safety scores shown in the chart above. There are two lines to evaluate. The Safety Rating is listed as a Green line, while the Average Safety Rating, among all other vehicles we have NHTSA safety data for, is listed as a Gray line. 

If you want to be safe on the road with your family in a Ford Expedition, it’s important you know which SUVs are rated the best. Overall, the Expedition gets decent safety scores. However, we aren’t impressed with the 2001-2002 and 2011 Ford Expedition. Aside from that, the 2006-2007 and 2012-2014 models also perform below average.

The better the safety rating is, the easier it becomes to get cheap car insurance for your used SUV

If you live in one of the states listed below, we can show you the cheapest vehicles to insure in yours. 

What Used Cars Are the Cheapest To Insure In:
Ohio
North Carolina
Michigan
Georgia
Texas
New York
Illinois
Pennsylvania
California

MPG – Over The Years

Ford Expedition MPG Value

The Ford Expedition is a big vehicle, so no one is expecting superior fuel economy ratings. Yet, there can be a big difference at the pump when considering an SUV that gets 14 versus 19 mpg. The graph illustrated above reveals the average mpg by model year, based on information from Fueleconomy.gov

Overall, Ford Expedition efficiency increases with each generation. There are a few dips as the models get newer, but nothing out of control. If you want to save money at the pump, we recommend evaluating a 2018 model year or newer.

Current Market Value of All Ford Expedition Years & Cost Per Year to Repair and Maintain Each

Ford Expedition Current Market Value vs Cost of Repairs

As you look at the average maintenance and repair cost of a Ford Expedition, it’s important to look at the data in relation to the reliability scores. If the family SUV deals with expensive engine or transmission repairs, you have to put out more money. The Ford SUV also spends more time in the shop for every repair.

You also see how these costs affect the resale value of Ford Expedition models. Resale value goes up as models get newer, for the most part. Part of that is because the newer models tend to have fewer failures. When looking at this chart, you see the Gray line illustrates the Average Cost of Repairs, while the Green line shows us the average KBB market value. 

If you compare two models with similar resale values, it often makes sense to purchase a new model with upgraded technology and features. Just be sure you look at that model’s reliability data to ensure it won’t cost more in the long run.

When shopping for a used Ford Expedition, it’s important to keep in mind that not all vehicles are cared for equally. To protect yourself from lemons, take along a FIXD Sensor on your test drive. FIXD connects to a free app on your smartphone to tell you more about the vehicle you’re checking out, including check engine lights and other hidden issues that the owner or dealership may be attempting to hide. Click here to learn more and get FIXD for only $19.99 (regular price $59)!

Important Features Timeline

Ford Expedition Timeline of Important Features

1997: First Expedition model released to replace the Bronco, shares a platform with the F-150

1998: No major changes

1999: Power input increased with Triton V8 motors, four new colors released

2000: Restyled wheels, newly available optional side airbags, and new rear sonar system released for backing up

2001: XLT earns standard privacy glass, Eddie Bauer models receive HomeLink, a Class IV trailer package (4x4s only) and optional second-row leather captain’s chairs

2002: BeltMinder warning system installed to keep occupants buckled, XLT has optional rear video entertainment system

2003: Completely redesigned 2nd generation

2004: XLS trim replaces the XLT, NBX tri replaces the FX4 off-road package, tire pressure monitoring is now standard

2005: Redesigned instrument cluster display, 5.4L V8 added with more power, Limited trim and King Ranch package debut

2006: King Ranch comes with a chrome-tipped exhaust pipe, while the Limited trim’s wood steering wheel becomes an option

2007: Start of 3rd generation includes many upgrades, such as a redesigned suspension, larger brakes, new power-steering pump, and a six-speed automatic transmission

2008: King Ranch becomes a trim level with leather interior and upgraded wheels, keyless entry pad standard on all models

2009: New features include a capless fuel filler, rain-sensing wipers, SYNC multimedia voice control, satellite radio, and a perimeter alarm

2010: Standard trailer sway control added, new programmable MyKey

2011: New XL base model added, Eddie Bauer Edition discontinued

2012: Standard blind-spot monitors added, XLT now offers optional heated second-row seats

2013: Base XL trim discontinued, optional integrated brake controller available

2014: Optional load-leveling rear suspension becomes available

2015: Updates include new suspension features, a new engine, and upgraded interior

2016: SYNC 3 infotainment system replaces the MyFord Touch system

2017: Last model of the 3rd generation remains unchanged

2018: Fully redesigned 4th generation includes a ten-speed automatic transmission, a more powerful V6 engine and new interior features

2019: New Stealth Edition package debuts

2020: King Ranch now offered in Regular and Max configurations, Co-Pilot360 now standard with all trim levels

2021: XL base trim debuts only as a five-passenger SUV, Co-Pilot360 Assist available with XLT trim

2022: Newly available vertical touchscreen shared from Mustang Mach-E, V6 offers as much power as the F-150 Raptor, hand-free BlueCruise offered on Platinum trim

The Best Years of the Ford Expedition

Ford Logo on the grille of Ford Expedition vehicle

If you want to pick the best model years of the Ford Expedition, you can’t simply look at one factor. Instead, you must evaluate the FIXD app engine reliability data, owner feedback scores, fuel economy rating and safety test scores as a package. When you look at the SUV models this way, you’ll better understand which ones are worth your money. It’s also valuable to examine the diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) from every year, and the open recalls listed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

2021 Ford Expedition

FIXD Reliability Score: 10/10

Owner Reliability Score: 10/10

KBB Value: $45,027

Fuel Economy: 19 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $250

Safety Rating: 4.6/5

The 2021 Ford Expedition is the only model to score a perfect rating with owners and from the FIXD app scores. To top it off, this model is extremely cheap to own, based on estimates.

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2021 Ford Expedition 10 out of 10. Even the Owners Reliability score is ranked 10 out of 10. 

The NHTSA crash testing scores further show that this Ford SUV is worth your family’s travel. With a score of 4.6 (out of 5), you know it performs well in a crash.

For now, the average cost of repair and maintenance is $250. Part of this may be due to the factory warranty, which lasts 3 years or 36,000 miles or the powertrain warranty, lasting 5 years or 60,000 miles.  

A top problem that’s reported is the Cylinder 2 misfire detected (P0302) code. It reveals the need for a spark plug replacement, costing between $58 and $167. Another problem that occurs is the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 2 (P0430) code. We don’t have enough information yet to reveal what the fix is and how much it costs, but it should still be covered under the warranty. 

Sadly, the 2021 Ford Expedition does have three open recalls, which is high for a newer model. There’s also the possibility for a fire risk, but these problems can be repaired at no charge. 

2018-2019 Ford Expedition

black 2018 ford expedition on the road

FIXD Reliability Score: 8-9/10

Owner Reliability Score: 4-10/10

KBB Value: $29,078-$34,967

Fuel Economy: 19 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $250

Safety Rating: 4.6-4.8/5

There are also near-perfect scores with the 2019 Ford Expedition. Plus, the 2018 and 2019 models are cheap to own and have a superior safety record.

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2018 Ford Expedition 9 out of 10, while the 2019 model earns 8 out of 10. The Owners Reliability score on the 2019 Expedition is ranked a perfect 10 out of 10, but the 2018 model only gets a 4 out of 10. It’s highly likely that the FIXD Reliability score is higher than the Owner Reliability score because there isn’t enough data yet. With a high instance of engine repairs reported on the 2018 Expedition, values may change as more information is collected. It’s also possible that there weren’t a lot of 2018 owners surveyed, making the averages skewed. 

The NHTSA crash testing scores show that these Ford SUVs have your back. With a score of 4.6 (out of 5) on the 2018 model and 4.8 (out of 5) with the 2019 Expedition, you know what to expect.

With both models, we see an average repair and maintenance cost of $250. Yet, there are some inconsistencies with engine repair bills when looking at the 2018 models. As more owners of these SUVs share their responses, we will receive better data.

A major problem occurring with both models is the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 2 (P0430) code. At this time, we anticipate the SUV needing a catalytic converter, which could cost $1,538 to $2,041 if the Ford is no longer covered under warranty. There’s also a higher chance of the Intake Camshaft Position Timing- Over-Advanced -Bank 2 (P0021) code with the 2018 Ford Expedition. In some cases, this problem resolves after an oil change. 

The 2018 Ford Expedition is subject to six recalls. In comparison, the 2019 Ford Expedition only has three. 

2015-2017 Ford Expedition

A white 2015 Ford Expedition at a car show parked inside a mall

FIXD Reliability Score: 5-9/10

Owner Reliability Score: 9-10/10

KBB Value: $11,156-$18,506

Fuel Economy: 17 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $679-$750

Safety Rating: 4.6-4.8/5

These three Expedition models continue to excel in reliability rankings and safety ratings. While the maintenance and repair cost is a little higher than the others we’ve discussed, it’s still on the lower side. 

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2015 Ford Expedition 5 out of 10, while the 2016 model earns 8 out of 10. At the top of the three is the 2017 Expedition, with a 9 out of 10. The Owners Reliability score on the 2015 and 2017 Expeditions are ranked a perfect 10 out of 10, but the 2016 model earned slightly less with a 9 out of 10. 

There is still no major safety concern based on the NHTSA crash testing scores. Both the 2016 and 2017 Expedition earn a 4.6 (out of 5), while the 2015 Ford Expedition is rated at 4.8 (out of 5).

The annual repair and maintenance costs are closely related between the three models, but the 2017 has a smaller chance of needing major engine repairs. However, it does seem to be more prone to expensive AC/heat repairs. 

All three models tend to deal with the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 2 (P0430) code. Based on our data, the most likely repair is a catalytic converter, which could cost $1,538 to $2,041. The 2015 and 2017 Ford Expedition both show signs of the O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage – Bank 1, Sensor 1 (P0131) code. To repair this, you may need to replace the oxygen sensor, costing $153 to $306.

When it comes to recalls, the 2015 Ford Expedition is dealing with one, while the 2016 Ford Expedition shows two. Additionally, the 2017 Ford Expedition also has two worth looking into.

2009-2010 Ford Expedition

FIXD Reliability Score: 2-4/10

Owner Reliability Score: 9/10

KBB Value: $4,515-$5,501

Fuel Economy: 15-16 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $250-$350

Safety Rating: 4.5/5

Even though they are older models, these two Expeditions deserve to be on the list. Not only do they receive favorable owner reliability scores, but they are also on the lower side to maintain and repair.

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2009 Ford Expedition 2 out of 10, while the 2010 model earns 4 out of 10. The Owners Reliability score on the 2009 and 2010 Expeditions are ranked 9 out of 10. It’s good to see the Owner Reliability score so much higher because this reveals what real-life drivers think, whereas the FIXD score is based solely on data. 

With the NHTSA crash testing scores remaining high, you can still drive with peace of mind. Both the 2009 and 2010 Expedition earned a 4.5 (out of 5).

The 2009 Ford Expedition averages $250 a year in maintenance and repair, while the 2010 Ford Expedition only goes up slightly to $350 a year. Either way, neither seems to suffer from frequent engine or transmission repair bills totaling more than $500. Still, both do show an increase in AC/Heat repair bills, and the 2010 seems to have more trouble with the fuel system. 

Between the two models, the only code that seems to happen with both is On Board Diagnostic System Readiness Test Not Complete (P1000). We don’t have the best fixes recorded for this yet, but it doesn’t always mean something major is wrong. The 2009 Ford Expedition also faces the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 1 (P0420) code. If the SUV needs a catalytic converter, you could be looking at $1,538 to $2,041. Additionally, the 2010 Ford Expedition suffers from O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction – Bank 2, Sensor 1 (P0150). This repair could require an oxygen sensor, costing $153 to $306. 

Looking at the recalls, the 2009 Ford Expedition has two, while the 2010 Ford Expedition shows zero to worry about. 

The Worst Years of the Ford Expedition

1998 Ford Expedition in the city street.

 

2001-2006 Ford Expedition

Black offroad car 2001 Ford Expedition in the city street.

FIXD Reliability Score: 1/10

Owner Reliability Score: 5-8/10

KBB Value: $2,128-$2,715

Fuel Economy: 14 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $417-$1,050

Safety Rating: 3.5-5/5

If you want to avoid Expedition models with problems, stay away from some of the 1st generation and all of the 2nd. These have low FIXD App Reliability scores and terrible fuel economy. 

The FIXD Reliability scores all six Ford Expedition models the lowest it can, with a 1 out of 10. In comparison, the Owners Reliability scores the models between 5 and 8 out of 10, with the 2001 ranking the highest.

NHTSA crash testing also varies among these models. The 2001 and 2002 Expeditions only earned 3.5 (out of 5), which is alarming. However, the 2006 Expedition is rated 4.5 (out of 5), while the other three models earned a perfect score of 5 (out of 5).

The lowest cost of repair and maintenance in this bunch is the 2001 Ford Expedition at $417 a year. On the other hand, the 2002 Expedition averages $1,050 a year. These are important figures to look at when buying a used model. However, all six seem to suffer from expensive repairs, either to the engine or transmission, causing them to be ranked at the bottom in our estimation. 

The 2001, 2003, and 2004 Ford Expedition models all deal with the Bank 1 has too much air or not enough fuel – lean bank (P0171) code. Additionally, the 2001-2004 Ford Expeditions also suffer from the Evaporative emission control system leak – medium (P0442) code. Finally, the 2005 and 2006 models show On Board Diagnostic System Readiness Test Not Complete (P1000).

The 2001 Ford Expedition has ten recalls and six investigations, which is alarming. The 2002 Ford Expedition has four recalls and two investigations, while the 2003 Ford Expedition shows six recalls and a single investigation. On the newer side, the 2004 Ford Expedition has four recalls and two investigations, the 2005 Ford Expedition reveals five recalls and one investigation and the 2006 Ford Expedition is subject to six recalls and one investigation. 

2007-2008 Ford Expedition

FIXD Reliability Score: 1-2/10

Owner Reliability Score: 7-9/10

KBB Value: $3,854-$4,762

Fuel Economy: 14-15 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $906-$1,250

Safety Rating: 4-4.5/5

The start of the 3rd generation doesn’t fare well either. Not only are the FIXD Reliability scores low, but these have some of the highest repair and maintenance bills.

The FIXD Reliability scores all 2008 Ford Expedition with a 1 out of 10, while the 2007 Expedition does a little better with a 2 out of 10. In comparison, the Owners Reliability ranking scores the 2007 Ford Expedition with a 7 out of 10 and the 2008 with a 9 out of 10. 

NHTSA crash testing also varies among these two models. The 2007 Expeditions earns 4 (out of 5), which is below average for the segment. However, the 2008 Expedition is rated 4.5 (out of 5.

The lowest cost of repair and maintenance out of these two is the 2008 Ford Expedition, but still excessively high at $906 a year. In comparison, the 2007 Expedition averages $1,250 a year, which is the second highest of all models. In multiple categories, these two SUVs show a higher chance of expensive repairs, from engines to transmissions and brakes.

The 2007 Ford Expedition is known for the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 1 (P0420) code. If the SUV requires a new catalytic converter, you could be looking at $1,538 to $2,041. Both models also suffer from the On Board Diagnostic System Readiness Test Not Complete (P1000) DTC. In addition, we see the Bank 2 has too much air or not enough fuel (P0174) code with the 2008 Expedition. If this repair requires spark plugs, you may spend $58 to $167. 

Looking at recalls, the 2007 Ford Expedition shows two recalls and one investigation, while the 2008 Ford Expedition has five recalls and one investigation. 

2011-2014 Ford Expedition

2012 White Ford Expedition in a parking lot

FIXD Reliability Score: 5-8/10

Owner Reliability Score: 7-9/10

KBB Value: $4,604-$10,432

Fuel Economy: 15-16 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $250-$750

Safety Rating: 3-4/5

Looking at these four Expedition models, we see some other alarming problems. The safety ratings aren’t good and there are some higher chances of expensive repair bills. 

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2012 Ford Expedition with a 5 out of 10, while the 2011 Expedition does a little better with a 7 out of 10. Both the 2013 and 2014 models earn an 8 out of 10. In comparison, the Owners Reliability ranking scores the 2014 Ford Expedition with a 7 out of 10 and the 2013 with an 8 out of 10. Both the 2011 and 2012 Expedition get a 9 out of 10. 

NHTSA crash testing varies, but none of them are good. The 2011 Expeditions only earned 3 (out of 5). The other three Expeditions get 4 (out of 5), which is still below average for the segment.

Among these four models, the lowest cost of repair and maintenance is with the 2014 at $250 a year. The 2012 Expedition averages $417 a year, while the other two are at $750 a year. However, it’s the instances of expensive failures that several of these deal with. The 2011 is known for hefty brake and AC/heat repair bills, while the 2013 has AC/heat problems and the 2014 Expedition suffers from expensive engine repairs. 

The 2012 to 2014 Ford Expedition shows the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 1 (P0420) code. With a new catalytic converter, you could be looking at $1,538 to $2,041. Additionally, the 2011 Ford Expedition shows an increased likelihood of the Throttle Actuator Control Throttle Body Air Flow Trim At Max Limit (P115E) code. For this repair, you may need a new electronic throttle body (ETB), costing between $321 and $460.

2011 Ford Expedition models don’t have any recalls, but the 2012 Ford Expedition shows three. Additionally, the 2013 Ford Expedition and the 2014 Ford Expedition have zero recalls. 

2020 Ford Expedition

FIXD Reliability Score: 10/10

Owner Reliability Score: 9/10

KBB Value: $20,687

Fuel Economy: 19 mpg 

Annual Maintenance/Repair: $1,375

Safety Rating: 4.8/5

The 2020 Ford Expedition came so close to making our “best” list except for being the most expensive model to maintain and repair. 

The FIXD Reliability scores the 2020 Ford Expedition with a perfect 10 out of 10. Additionally, the Owners Reliability ranking scores the 2020 model with a 9 out of 10. 

NHTSA crash testing also shows a decent score. The 2020 Expeditions has earned a 4.8 (out of 5), which is close to perfect.

However, the 2020 Ford Expedition also shows an extremely high cost of repair and maintenance at $1,375. Considering the higher likelihood of engine, transmission, AC/heat and fuel system repairs, this newer model may end up costing more than it’s worth. 

The 2020 Ford Expedition shows a higher chance of the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 1 (P0420) code and the Catalyst system efficiency below threshold – Bank 2 (P0430) code. If either of these requires a new catalytic converter, you will likely spend between $1,538 to $2,041, especially if your SUV is out of warranty. 

The 2020 Ford Expedition is also the subject of eight recalls and one NHTSA investigation, which is a lot for a newer model. 

FAQs

What years of the Ford Expedition have engine and/or transmission problems?

Our investigation shows the 2020, 2018, 2014-2016, 2008, 2006, and 2001-2002 Expeditions all with a higher chance of expensive engine repairs. Additionally, costly transmission repairs are more common with the 2020, 2010, 2006-2007, 2004, and 2001 Ford Expedition models. 

What is considered high mileage for a Ford Expedition?

Large SUVs are sure to get used heavily because many of them are family vehicles. However, it’s difficult to estimate the average mileage for the Ford Expedition. With proper maintenance and controlled driving practices, the SUV could easily last more than 200,000 miles. Yet, these SUVs are also prone to failing early if they haven’t been maintained and cared for.

Based on our data, high mileage could be considered anything over 175,000 miles.

Older Expedition models (2001-2013) show an average mileage range between 141,667 and 212,500. Our data shows several Expedition models exceeding 200,000 miles. Yet, past the point of about 175,000 miles, the resale value drops significantly, leaving the owner to junk the car at the first expensive repair bill. 

Newer models may be built better and last longer, but it could take several more years to see if this assumption is true. Our initial reliability studies suggest that the latest Expedition models may exceed the mileage of the older SUVs.

What other vehicles should I consider?

Ford has a long list of SUVs to consider. You can choose something smaller, such as the EcoSport, Escape, Bronco Sport, Bronco, Explorer, or Edge. There is also an electric SUV available now, the Mach-E. If you are looking to haul a large family, you may even consider the Ford Transit. Otherwise, the Ford lineup of trucks has a lot to offer.

There’s also the possibility of choosing something outside of the Ford family. For example, some of the top competitors to the Ford Expedition include the Chevrolet Suburban, Chevrolet Tahoe, or the GMC Yukon. 

What owners of the Ford Expedition like to use their car for:

Percent based x/5-star: 0-10% = 1, 11-20% = 2, 21-30% = 3, 31-40% = 4, 41%+ = 5

Frequent Use Categories: How Useful? (Out of 5 Stars)
Family Vehicle ****
Lots of Driving (travel/long commute) ***
Hauling/Towing **
Office on Wheels *
Sport/Fast Driving *
Luxurious Driving *
Outdoor/Off-Road *

A Note About Data and Information Sources

This article has many details about Ford Expedition reliability; here’s what we used for our assumptions and recommendations.

  • FIXD Reliability Score & Data: Engine reliability information is captured via the FIXD App

The FIXD Reliability Score is calculated using the number of DTCs per year, weighted by mileage. This is then turned into a scale of 1-10 for easy graphing. 

This is an objective score.

  • Owner Reliability Score & Data: This data is the result of surveying Ford Expedition owners who use FIXD. 

The Owner Reliability Score comes straight from owners of the Ford Expedition.  

This is a subjective score.

To determine the Owner Reliability Score we ask each car owner:

How reliable would you say your Ford Expedition is?

a. Just point A to point B driving

b. A Daily Commuter

c. Good for a 100 mile road trip

d. Good for a 500 mile road trip

e. I could take a cross-country road trip, no problem

From here we translate their answers into the Owner Reliability Score:

a. = 2

b. = 4

c. = 6

d. = 8

e. = 10

Keep in mind, owners may think their car is more or less reliable than it actually is. 

One potential problem is that people often buy the same make or model they are used to when they go car shopping, just a newer year.

Ford, for instance, has a number of consumer loyalty awards for the Ford F-Series, Ford Mustang, and Ford Expedition.

Car owners may be so loyal to the make or model they currently own that they would have trouble accurately comparing their cars’ reliability to others. 

It’s for this reason that we ask car owners a question that is relative to mileage rather than relative to other cars. 

Still, be mindful of the accuracy of these Owner Reliability Scores, people’s perceptions and unconscious blindspots can skew data. 

We suggest looking at both the FIXD Reliability Score and the Owner Reliability Score for this reason.

  • KBB Value: Average private-seller valuations as supplied by Kelley Blue Book (KBB), based on a Chevrolet Equinox with typical mileage for that respective model year.
  • Fuel Economy: Mileage-per-gallon estimates according to the EPA MPG on Fueleconomy.gov
  • Annual Maintenance/Repair: Upkeep expenses as reported by surveyed Ford Expedition owners
  • Safety Rating: Crash test data collected and reported by NHTSA. We average all ratings for each year to come up with a simplified, average safety score. This makes it easier to look at on a graph.

References

  1. Ford Expedition Sales Figures, carsalesbase.com. Retrieved April 30, 2023, from https://carsalesbase.com/us-ford-expedition/ 
  2. Ford Expedition Review, edmunds.com. Retrieved May 2, 2023, from https://www.edmunds.com/ford/expedition/ 
  3. Ford Factory Warranty, (February 13, 2023) motor1.com. Retrieved May 2, 2023, from https://www.motor1.com/products-services/auto-warranty/ford-factory-warranty/ 
Brian Jones Profile Picture

Brian Jones owns a used car dealership outside of Dallas, Texas. He has also worked for decades as an ASE Certified Master Technician for a variety of new car dealerships. Now he spends his time consulting dealerships and writing for some renowned publications, such as Motor1 (https://www.motor1.com/info/team/brian-jones/). When he’s not working, he’s tinkering around with pickup trucks and traveling with his family.

We’re here to help you simplify car care and save, so this post may contain affiliate links to help you do just that. If you click on a link and take action, we may earn a commission. However, the analysis and opinions expressed are our own.

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About the Author

Brian Jones

Brian Jones

Brian Jones owns a used car dealership outside of Dallas, Texas. He has also worked for decades as an ASE Certified Master Technician for a variety of new car dealerships. Now he spends his time consulting dealerships and writing for some renowned publications, such as Motor1 (https://www.motor1.com/info/team/brian-jones/). When he's not working, he's tinkering around with pickup trucks and traveling with his family.

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